Training

Start Walking

Best way to train for Long Walk Home is just to get out there and start walking! You don’t have to do the whole 28km all at once, but start small and build up over time. This will allow your body to get used to walking the whole 28km.  

Test Your Shoes

This is a big one! The success of your walk will be attributed to a pair of amazing shoes, fitted perfectly to your feet. Do your shoes give you blisters? Do you feel pain in your ankles or arches during your training? Go out and buy a new pair of shoes, making sure you break them in before the Long Walk Home. 

What to eat

It’s important to be consistent with your meals while training. You can have either 3 large meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner, or 6 smaller meals throughout the day. Essential for each meal is a small piece of protein (your choice), LOTS of colourful veggies and a little bit of good fat – avocados and nuts. Leading up to the walk, you want to eat LOW GI carbs like brown rice, pumpkin, sweet potato, sourdough bread especially leading up to the last couple of days so you are fuelling your body with slow-release energy for the walk. Don’t forget to hydrate by drinking lots of water leading up to the day.   

Stretch it out

In the lead up to the walk, make sure you are feeling sound from top to bottom. Before and after each training session, make sure you are having a stretch to prepare and recuperate. If you are having aches and pains, go get checked out by a physiotherapist. 

Rest

Train hard, rest hard. Rest is just as important as training. Reward yourself for a good walk and plonk yourself down on the couch for a Netflix session.  

Be proud of yourself

Each training session knows you are walking closer and closer towards your goal of walking the full 28km with the Long Walk Home. Every step you train, you are stepping into the shoes of someone sleeping rough, who on average walks 28km every week, looking for a place to sleep. Remember that your contribution to Long Walk Home allows Wayside Chapel to lighten this load for people experiencing homelessness.